1-2-3 "Syn-co-pate!"

This is a Step pattern from www.turnstep.com. (pattern 637)

Combo I

Combo II

Combo III


Notes:

Combo I:

When teaching the turn + grapevine, use 3 turns + grapevine at first to avoid dizziness until the combo is put all together!

Little T-step: I'm not sure if this is the same as what some people call an L-step done twice, but it is performed from the side of the bench at its end:


                             ____
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                            |    |
                           X|_XX_|X
                              XX

Assuming a right lead from the left side of the bench:

To do 1/2 little T with hop-turn, perform beats 1-4 and hop-turn on beats 5-8. This will bring you to the opposite side of the bench to begin the combo again OR go on to Combo II.

Combo II:

If you've never done a Heavy V, it is the equivalent of two V-steps. Assuming a right lead:

It's easy to do, but it looks really cool. For added effect, I punch both arms in the direction of the V on beats 1 and 3.

Combo III

Whew! Syncopation is hard enough to explain when you are in person. I have a degree in education, so let's see if it will pay off.

Syncopation: If you haven't used syncopation before, think of saying "1-2-3" in the same time it takes to count two beats. Beat 7-8 is a particularly good place for a syncopation. Think of counting:
"1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8"
Now think: "1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 1-2-3"
When teaching it to a class, it helps to have the words mirror the action, so try counting:
"1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6-syn-co-pate"

In a 6-point turn, the syncopation happens as a straddle on the floor. (It feels like a shuffle - shift your weight, right-left-right.) Traditionally, the emphasis of the phrasing is on beats 1 and 5: <1>2 3 4 <5>6 7 8. In a syncopation, the phrasing shifts a bit, with emphasis on beats 1, 4, and 7: <1>2 3 <4>5 6 <7>8 It helps to have a musical or dance background, but is not necessary.

A 6-point turn is performed this way, assuming a right lead:

Teaching the 6-point turn: A 6-point turn can be performed without the syncopation (and should be when teaching it in the early stages) by simply coming off the same side of the bench with a double clap on beats 7-8. Perform your favorite default lead-leg-change combo and begin again.

Good luck! If you can figure it out, it's really fun!

Thanks to Heather N. who taught the 6-point turn to Suzie M., who I stole it from. The rest, including the "syn-co-pate" breakdown, is mine.

Maggie Rappaport Tucson, AZ


Added by Maggie Rappaport at 12:20 AM on Monday, March 10, 1997 EST. Add to favorites (view favorites)
(Email: fzws15b@prodigy.com)
From: Tucson, Arizona (USA)
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